Florence Welch reveals it’s ‘a miracle’ she hasn’t had a relapse of her eating disorder during lockdown

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‘It’s the closest I’ve ever thought about it’: Florence Welch says it’s ‘a miracle’ she hasn’t had an eating disorder relapse during lockdown, as she says of battling anorexia in the UK past

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Florence Welch has revealed it’s “a miracle” she didn’t relapse from an eating disorder during the lockdown.

The frontwoman of Florence + The Machine previously spoke about overcoming her eating disorder, battling anorexia and deciding to stop drinking and embrace sobriety eight years ago.

But Florence, 35, says she thought about her old treacherous food patterns during the coronavirus pandemic, admitting to British Vogue ‘it’s a slippery slope’ once that starts to happen.

Opening: Florence Welch has revealed it’s ‘a miracle’ she didn’t have an eating disorder relapse during lockdown (photo November 2021)

In the interview, she said, “When you’re sober, it’s unfiltered reality all day every day. You don’t get a brain teaser.

“I really fucking empathize with anyone who has had a relapse in those two years because I think this was probably the closest I’ve ever thought about it.

“There were times when I thought, ‘Should I start cutting back on my sugar? Or should I do a cleanse?’ And that’s just a slippery slope for me.

“Anorexia gives a sense of security because you’re like, I’m going to get this under control.”

Strong: The Florence + The Machine frontwoman previously spoke out about overcoming her eating disorder, anorexia, and quit drinking eight years ago

Strong: The Florence + The Machine frontwoman previously spoke out about overcoming her eating disorder, anorexia, and quit drinking eight years ago

The star went on to talk about the strong support network she has around her to keep her from relapsing.

She said: ‘Luckily I have people I can talk to and that’s one of the most important things for everyone: keep talking about it. And don’t be ashamed when those thoughts come up.’

In 2018, hitmaker Shake it Out admitted she feared she would die if she didn’t give up alcohol, even though she felt an “extreme identity” was a big part of who she was.

She said, “Being an extreme drinker was a big part of my identity. Music and alcohol are kind of my first two loves.

“When I stopped, I felt like I was letting go of a ghost from rock history that I just couldn’t take anymore. It was monumental.

“It wasn’t like, ‘I want to be healthy and I need a change of pace.’ It was like, ‘I’m going to die. I have to stop.’ †

Struggle: The 35-year-old singer admitted to thinking about her old eating habits during the long coronavirus pandemic, telling British Vogue 'it's a slippery slope' once that happens (pictured during a performance with her band in March 2019)

Struggle: The 35-year-old singer admitted to thinking about her old eating habits during the long coronavirus pandemic, telling British Vogue ‘it’s a slippery slope’ once that happens (pictured during a performance with her band in March 2019)

Speaking bravely about overcoming her eating disorder, Florence said, “I haven’t weighed myself in four years — I have no idea how much I weigh now.

“Five years ago I could have told you how much in the morning, in the evening, clothes on, clothes off. With and without jewelry.

“Letting go sometimes feels like a bigger achievement than headlining at Glastonbury.”

Despite how far she’s come, the superstar admitted she still has insecurities and social media seems to make that worse.

She said: “I can still get off the stage with a crowd applauding and go back to sit alone in my room, scrolling through my phone until I find enough things to make me really unhappy.

“While I love social media as a way to connect, it’s also a useful tool for digging your own personal shame hole.”

In the interview, she said, “When you’re sober, it’s unfiltered reality all day every day. You don’t get a brain teaser

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