Amazon introduces Halo Rise: Table Sleep Sensor with Wake Up Lamp

Amazon intends to expand its reach in the wellness market with the $ 140 Halo Rise, a new bedside sleep monitoring device coming later this year that doubles as a sunrise alarm clock. The premiere follows after Amazon has released its first Hello fitness tracker in 2020 and its continuation, called Hello viewin 2021. It’s also another sign that Amazon and other tech giants are trying to fix our dream.

The Halo Rise is designed as an alternative to the Halo wristband for those who prefer not to wear a wristband or smartwatch overnight but still want to monitor their sleep. Since it’s on the bedside table instead of on the body, it can also collect information about environmental factors that could be affecting your sleep, according to Amazon.

Halo Rise has no cameras or microphones. Instead, it uses low-energy sensors to detect micromovements that occur during breathing. Amazon then uses machine learning to translate these movements into sleep phases and present those insights in the Halo app. The company says the Halo Rise sleep algorithm has been trained and validated for polysomnography, a test that doctors usually use to observe sleep patterns.

Amazon announced the Halo Rise at the product’s annual fall launch on Wednesday, during which it also announced Fire-up scribe, Fire TV Omni QLEDthree new ones Echo dot smart speakers i much more.

Price: 140
Release date: Q4

Designed as an alternative to Amazon’s Halo Band for those who prefer not to wear a wristband or smartwatch overnight but still want to monitor their sleep, Rise is a sunrise alarm clock with sensors that capture information about your movement and the environment.

The launch of Halo Rise comes as sleep tracking has become a greater area of ​​focus for tech companies. Apple, for example, introduced the ability to monitor different stages of sleep using its own on the Apple Watch WatchOS 9 software update that was launched on September 12. Fitbit and SAMSUNG both launched sleep analysis functions over the past year that study long-term patterns and produce an animal mascot to symbolize the wearer’s dream.

And Google, which owns Fitbit, has built sleep tracking into its own Second generation Nest Hub from 2021. This device similarly uses proximity radar to observe sleep phases, but is also intended to be a multi-functional smart home device. Unlike Halo Rise, which was only designed with sleep in mind. While the lack of a microphone is reassuring from a privacy standpoint, it also means Halo Rise cannot detect snoring or coughing like the Nest Hub.

Amazon’s sleep detection gadget is making its debut at a time when the tech industry has come under scrutiny for personal quantities company data is collected and how this information is protected. Amazon says Halo Rise sends breathing patterns and micromovements to the cloud where they are translated into sleep phases, but data is encrypted in transit and in the cloud and is automatically deleted after 10 days. Amazon also states that the data always remains on your device until your sleep session begins, and will not sell or use health data for marketing, product recommendation, or advertising purposes.

Halo Rise owners will also be able to download and delete their health data, as is the case with Halo Band. Amazon says the device is trained to analyze only the person closest to it and not other people or animals in the same bed. According to Amazon, the Halo Rise algorithms are only trained to detect sleep and do not detect any other activity in the bedroom.


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When it comes to sleep-related metrics that Halo Rise can collect, there’s little that sets it apart from Amazon’s Halo Bands. Like Amazon wearables, it can tell you how much time you have spent in certain sleep phases and provide a sleep score that measures your sleep quality. It also comes with the Amazon Halo’s six-month membership, which typically costs $ 4 per month.

According to Amazon, one of the biggest advantages of using the Halo Rise over the Halo Band is that you don’t have to wear anything to sleep to get this data. Unlike the wristbands, Halo Rise can also detect certain elements of the environment, such as humidity, temperature, and light, that can interfere with a good night’s sleep. Amazon hasn’t said if it plans to create new metrics or insights based on data from the Halo Rise and Halo bands.

Screenshots showing Amazon's sleep tracking stats such as sleep score, sleep stages, and sleep environment against a blue background

Halo Rise can monitor sleep phases as well as environmental factors such as light and humidity.

Amazon

Since Halo Rise is designed to be placed on the bedside table, it also serves as an alarm clock and wake-up light. Amazon says it should wake you up at the optimal time based on your sleep phases. In addition to the aforementioned environmental sensors, Halo Rise also includes a digital clock with physical buttons and a small alarm speaker. The wake-up light consists of 300 lux LEDs in the shape of a semicircle.

There isn’t built-in Alexa functionality because Halo Rise was designed specifically for sleeping. But if you have an Echo, you can pair them with Halo Rise to ask Alexa how you slept, or incorporate Rise into your bedtime routine.

The introduction of a device like the Halo Rise not only helps Amazon compete more closely with rivals such as Google and Apple, but it could also provide the company with an even stronger foothold at home. According to Strategy Analytics, Amazon accounted for 28.2% of the global market for smart speakers and smart displays in the first quarter of 2022. Google is Amazon’s closest competitor, occupying 17.2% of the market over the same period.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and does not constitute health or medical advice. Always consult your physician or other qualified health care professional with any questions about your health condition or health goals.

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